You're reading...
Viewpoint!, Workshops and Events

Another great Rory Peck Awards evening

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Tonight I attended the annual Rory Peck Awards, hosted by the Rory Peck Trust, to celebrate the work of freelance newsgatherers worldwide.  Most people watching the News on TV probably don’t realise how much of the footage is shot by freelancers.  These are self-employed people who put their lives on the line, literally, to bring the most dramatic and important stories into our living rooms.

I thought the evening and films seemed to have a different feel this year, somehow.  Rather more insightful and looking at deeper issues from a fresh perspective (N. Korea, Westgate Mall, Russian homophobia). I suppose things have moved on from Iraq and Afghanistan to some extent.  Altogether a powerful set of films.

If you’d like to make a donation to this worthy cause, Sony will match every pound you give.

The Rory Peck Award for News was presented to 23 year old freelancer  from Central African Republic. Pacôme’s footage of the conflict in his home country depicts both the violence that erupted there and glimpses of everyday life.  Judges praised Pacôme’s ability to cast a dispassionate eye on a heated and dangerous conflict whilst living in its midst with one judge commenting that “the conviction he must have to keep going – to keep telling the story of his country – is admirable.”

The Rory Peck Award for Features was won by Team Mindeulle – a group of six anonymous North Koreans who film completely undercover and at immense risk. Their film provides an extremely rare glimpse into the inner workings of the world’s most secretive state where we see fascinating and eerie scenes of life there. Crucially, the film also hints towards signs of cracks in the regime’s control with ordinary people standing up to authority. Judges noted the enormous historical importance of the piece and the team’s extraordinary bravery in risking their lives to tell this story.

The Sony Impact Award was presented to British freelancer Ben Steele. His film explores the world of Russian vigilante gangs who, encouraged by recent anti-homosexual legislation, go on hunting “safaris” to catch, humiliate and abuse gay victims. Ben captures this world extremely close up; in one scene, he is present and continues filming in the small room where a young victim had been lured for a violent interrogation. Ben’s film had a massive impact when it was shown just before the Sochi winter Olympics – raising awareness and triggering public debate.

This year’s Martin Adler Prize, sponsored by Hexagon, was awarded to Palestinian freelance journalist, fixer and translator Khaled Abu Ghali. Khaled was awarded this prize in recognition of his professionalism, composure and unique skill as a journalist under even the most challenging of circumstances. He has covered many of Gaza’s most intense periods of conflict in his 14 year career, most notably in 2006, 2009, 2012, and Summer 2014 and has worked with, and contributed to, many of the world’s most prominent news outlets.

The aims of the Rory Peck Trust are to provide practical assistance and support to freelance newsgatherers and their families worldwide, to raise their profile, promote their welfare and safety, and to support their right to report freely and without fear.  I’ve been providing pro bono support to the Trust since 2007.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

 

.

.

.

 

Advertisements

Discussion

Comments are closed.

Connect with Ian Seath

Find us on Facebook Improvement Skills Consulting Ltd. on LinkedIn Follow IanJSeath on Twitter

Archives

Copyright Notice

© Improvement Skills Consulting Ltd. and Ian Seath, 2007-17. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Improvement Skills Consulting Ltd. and Ian Seath with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
%d bloggers like this: