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Change Management, Performance Management

Boring Leaders are great Leaders

In my Newsletter this week I’ve written about how Leadership is all about behaviour.  I’ve also written previously about the power of Introverts and how they just quietly get on with things, creatively and productively, without making much noise along the way.

So, this Harvard Business Review blog caught my eye: “Boringness: the secret to great Leadership“. Joel Stein writes about the research for his new book Man Made: A Stupid Quest for Masculinity

To my surprise, the best of them tended to be quiet listeners who let other people make most of the decisions. They weren’t particularly charismatic. Or funny. They weren’t the toughest guys in the pack. They didn’t have a Clintonian need to be liked, or a Patton-like intensity. They were, on the whole, a little boring.

He goes on to say that trying to inspire people through your personality is risky and exhausting; far better to make people feel like you’re going to help them accomplish something far bigger than you.

Last year I tweeted a few times about the power of introverts and Joel’s blog reminds me of some of those points and Susan Cain’s book “Quiet: The Power of Introverts“.  Introverts have been changing the world for a long time, from Van Gogh to Charles Darwin to Steve Wozniak.  I don’t know if these three were “boring” though!

So, if you’re an introvert and people say you’ve had a charisma bypass, you might just be a great leader.

 

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